Educator, leader, listener, and advocate.  These words describe just several of the many essential roles nurses play at Gillette in addition to their most visible role as caregiver.  As we continue celebrating National Nurses Week, let’s take a closer look at a Gillette nurse’s everyday tasks—and discover there’s far more to this profession than what you see on the surface.   

Action:  Giving a child a Popsicle after surgery

Nurse is also: Action:  Giving a child a Popsicle after surgery

  •   Checking digestive function to make sure a child’s stomach is “waking up” after surgery
  •   Providing pain relief if a child’s throat is sore
  •   Assessing neurological status:  alertness, swallowing function, motor skills, cognition and pain level

 

Action: Repositioning a child to keep them comfortable 

Nurse is also: Action: Repositioning a child to keep them comfortable 

  •   Keeping the child’s arms or legs elevated to reduce pain and swelling after surgery
  •   Preventing stiffness, skin breakdowns, or sore spots from developing
  •   Encouraging activity  
  •   Ensuring the child’s position optimizes breathing and lung function
  •   Preventing complications like blood clots

 

Action:  Asking a patient family if they are excited and ready to go home

Action:  Asking a patient family if they are excited and ready to go homeNurse is also:

  • Assessing comfort level and coping skills to ensure a good recovery after discharge
  • Creating an opportunity to educate the patient family about home care, what to expect, and what to do if problems arise

 

 

Action:  Helping a child fill out a menu for a meal

Nurse is aAction:  Helping a child fill out a menu for a meallso: 

  • Guiding nutritious choices to promote wound healing, recovering from surgery, hydration, blood sugar management, bowel management or weight management.
  • Educating the patient family about nutrition and goal-setting around food choices
  • Encouraging independence and self-confidence

 

Action: Listening to mom or dad talk about their child

NurseAction: Listening to mom or dad talk about their child is also:

  • Providing emotional support during a child’s hospitalization
  • Assessing where caregivers may be overburdened, overwhelmed or lacking resources at home and identifying ways to help
  • Establishing a partnership with the family in the care of their child
  • Identifying cultural or spiritual needs during the patient’s stay
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