Inside Gillette Blog

From Juvenile Arthritis to Miss Teen Minnesota

Posted On: 07/06/2015

By Nicole Doyle, Miss Teen Minnesota 2015

As a three-year-old at the pediatrician’s office, I did not know what was going on.  But I remember this day distinctly.  I remember my doctor extending, bending, and checking all of my joints.  The next thing I remember is entering a lab while holding my big purple stuffed bunny and squeezing tight.  I did not want to be poked and prodded, but I had to.  From Juvenile Arthritis to Miss Teen Minnesota

This blood test forever changed my life.  “I’m sorry to tell you this but your daughter has juvenile rheumatoid arthritis,” said the doctor.  My parents were clueless: “kids can get arthritis?” Shortly after my diagnosis, we were sent to Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare. They care for children and teens like me who have a broad range of rheumatic and inflammatory conditions. We were also sent because at this time, they were the only facility with pediatric rheumatologists in Minnesota. Thanks to the knowledgeable doctors at Gillette, I started an intense treatment plan to get this disease under control with a drug called methotrexate.  

The treatment was okay at the start, but then I started to get sick. I was soon old enough to know what the medication led to:  sickness, nausea, vomiting, and me missing school and activities. I remember being a little spitfire: sneaking upstairs claiming that I would only drink my medicine “alone,” yet secretly I was pouring it down the sink. Soon after, though, I would experience continuous flair-ups.  Dr. Richard Vehe educated me on the importance of From Juvenile Arthritis to Miss Teen Minnesotataking my medication consistently. I learned some valuable things that I’d like to share with other children and families dealing with this diagnosis.

For Kids and Teens:  You are not alone!  Treatment may stink at times, and side effects may be difficult, but it is very important! In fact, early drug treatment can prevent serious, permanent damage to your joints. And I encourage you to find a way to overcome arthritis through your strength and your hobbies, something that you like. It could be sports, artwork, blogging, anything. Find your “thing” and don’t let your diagnosis define you.

For Parents:  Be your child’s support system. Stand by them, listen to them, and do your best to help them! Early drug treatment can prevent serious joint damage, enabling to your child to live an active, full childhood despite juvenile arthritis.

Believe it or not, this disease started as a negative for my family and me. But thanks to the encouragement from the wonderful staff at Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare and my own willpower, I have now turned my diagnosis into a positive! I have learned to live with this disease, and fight it too! I am living proof that anyone can overcome JRA.  I even played hockey and lacrosse for Lakeville South High School. From Juvenile Arthritis to Miss Teen Minnesota

One of the biggest things that helped me overcome JRA is pageants.  I recently entered Miss Teen Minnesota International because I wanted a weekend to be myself, get glammed up, have fun, meet new people, but most importantly spread the word that “Kids get arthritis too!” Little did I know I would now have a whole year of being able to raise awareness!

As Miss Teen Minnesota, I am honored to speak at schools, events, fundraisers, and even with children and their families. Sharing my story and informing others about this disease is one of my favorite things to do—and I encourage other children living with arthritis to do the same.  Join the Juvenile Arthritis Walk, make a team, talk about it, raise money to find a cure, and spread the word.

For more information about me and my story please visit my website

Birthday Parties and Pool Therapy: My Volunteer Story by Joni Purrington

Posted On: 04/14/2015

I love working with children and their families, and I have the honor of being a volunteer and former employee at Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare.

Volunteer Birthday Parties at Gillette Children'sI started with Gillette as a volunteer in the pool at the former Lake Phalen facility. In 1981, I became an employee, joining Gillette as the first director of pool therapy. I hold a doctorate of physical therapy degree, and I believe that water is an equalizing medium for a lifetime of fun! When you see a group of children having fun in an aquatic setting, there is little difference between those who have special needs and those who don’t.

Although I no longer work at Gillette, I began volunteering because I wanted to assist children who have differing abilities and educate them on how to be safe while enjoying the water. Since then I have served as a member of the fundraising organization Friends of Gillette, helped with fundraising events, and thrown monthly birthday parties for Gillette’s inpatient kids at the St. Paul campus.  

Planning the monthly birthday parties brings me a lot of joy. I work with Gillette’s Child Life staff to find out if any inpatient kids have a birthday coming up. I then develop a party theme for them. It’s the little things—like finding out if the birthday child is a boy or girl and learning their interests—that make planning the parties fun. On birthday party nights, all inpatient kids are invited. I bring in crafts for special projects and an ice cream cake from the North St. Paul Dairy Queen.

My goal is to plan activities that will interest children of various ages. I bring crafts that allow patients to complete a project as independently as possible—from choosing the activity to choosing the materials to completing the project. The kids can decide whether to make something for themselves or for someone else. If a patient has siblings, I bring enough materials so that everyone can participate.  Parents often enjoy working on the activities, too!

I’m inspired to volunteer as part of my philosophy of working with all children in our community. I continue to volunteer at Gillette because of the hospital's mission and vision. I’m inspired by the dedication of the hospital's leaders and by Gillette’s research efforts, leading edge medical care, and exemplary care for anyone who seeks the organization’s medical services.

And I’m really looking forward to Gillette’s new therapy pool opening later this year!

My Gillette Story by Jessica Boerboom, Mom to Joe

Posted On: 03/20/2015

How would you describe your child to someone who hasn't met him or her?

Joe is 8 years old and in second grade. He is the sweetest guy!  He has an engineering-type brain — he wants to know how stuff works, and he questions and processes constantly. At the same time, he can be a goofball!  Joe also loves to read. He’ll read anything from Ninja Turtles books to books about Abraham Lincoln.

How did your family come to find out about Gillette?

The summer before Joe started kindergarten, we began to notice he couldn’t keep up with other kids. I remember being at a waterpark and watching him climb a set of circular stairs. All the kids were passing him and my girlfriend asked, “Do you think he’s declining at all?” Later that summer, on a trip to Mall of America, he fell seven times. We saw his pediatrician the day before a 10-day family vacation to Boston.  She asked him to climb the stairs without using the handrail. He told her, “I can’t — I will fall.”  They did a blood test and said they would be back in touch in about a week.  When the phone rang the very next day, I knew something was wrong. They told us they suspected muscle disease, and even mentioned muscular dystrophy, and told me “our expertise ends here.”  They called Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare and, due to the urgency, we were able to get an appointment right after we got home from our vacation. It was the longest 10-day vacation ever, but we were blessed to be with family.

We had to wait six weeks for blood and genetic testing to confirm Joe’s diagnosis. It was the longest six weeks of my life.  Finally, it was confirmed that Joe has Becker muscular dystrophy.  Being newly diagnosed is an agonizing time period. That’s why, today, I’m a contact at the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) so I can help provide newly diagnosed families with emotional support.

What treatments and services has your child received at Gillette?

Joe sees Dr. Stephen Smith for neurology and Dr. Mark Gormley for physician medicine and rehabilitation. He wears ankle-foot orthoses at night and he’s done some physical therapy to work on mobility at Gillette, too. During one of our first visits at Gillette, we were connected with representatives from the MDA so that we could take advantage of their services and resources, such as a loaner stroller for Joe, and most recently, a scooter.

What has your experience at Gillette been like for your child and family?

Everyone—from Dr. Smith, to Dr. Gormley to Joe’s neuromuscular nurse, Kristin Morgan, is really great. We especially love Kristin. I think it’s wonderful we know she will be Joe’s nurse at every appointment. Kristin will call us 3 to 4 weeks before Joe’s next appointment just to see how he’s doing and if we have concerns so she can have answers ready at our next visit. We like all the familiar faces. Gillette knows our family and knows Joe. When Joe has an appointment near his birthday, they remember it and give him a gift. It’s a comfortable place for kids and we feel welcomed at Gillette.

What about your child makes you most proud?

Joe knows his own limitations, but he never complains. He just rolls with it. Joe has some tough days, but he is a really positive kid who takes it all in stride. He’s doing good—as best as he can be doing.

My Gillette Story by Tommy Collison

Posted On: 03/10/2015

Originally from rural Ireland, I grew up among cows, computers, and not much else. Now I’m a writer studying journalism and politics at New York University. When I’m not studying, I edit part of the student newspaper. My life today is thanks to the staff at Gillette Children's Specialty Healthcare, who gave me the confidence to move from Ireland to the U.S.

My Gillette Story: Tommy CollisonWhen I was born, my mom thought that my cries had an unusual pitch and worried that something was wrong. In the hospital, she asked the pediatrician about it, but her concern was dismissed. Over the months that followed, I was slow to develop. My parents weren’t overly perturbed, because the doctors had reassured them that the crying was due to colic, and I'd settled down. Plus, I was their third child. By this stage, they were experienced parents who accepted the fact that children develop at their own rate. It wasn’t until my routine 12-month developmental check that I was termed “developmentally delayed.” When I was 18 months old, I was officially diagnosed with cerebral palsy.

My mom became an expert on the subject. She read everything she could find. A physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist gave her a book by James R. Gage, M.D., of Gillette and she read it cover to cover with a medical dictionary by her side. After hearing Dr. Gage speak at a conference, my mom decided that if I should ever need surgery, we would go abroad and ask him for an opinion.

When I was 9, my parents and I began researching the surgical options at Gillette. My desire was pretty simple—I wanted to be able to stand straighter and walk faster.  A year later, in 2004, I arrived in the U.S. to undergo surgery with Dr. Gage and Tom Novacheck, M.D. I was astounded by how caring everyone was, bothMy Gillette Story by Tommy Collison inside the hospital and out of it. My dad tells the story of Dr. Gage coming into pre-op to talk to me and ask if I had any questions. My only question was about the color of the teddy bear that the nurses had promised me. I think that’s a pretty good indicator of the standard of care Gillette offers. I was about to undergo single-event multi-level surgery, and yet the teddy bear color was my most pressing concern.

After that initial surgery, I had two follow-up procedures with Dr. Novacheck in 2010 and 2012. During the second one, my brothers came from San Francisco to take care of me, allowing my parents to celebrate their wedding anniversary. They proved themselves totally capable of taking care of their “favorite youngest brother.”  The event sticks out in my mind as not so much a surgery but as a bonding experience.

If I have one piece of advice for other kids or teens who have a “disability,” it’s this: don’t let it define you. I wasn’t a 14-year-old who had cerebral palsy. I was the 14-year-old who loved drums, who read every book he could lay his hands on, and who probably played his music too loud. As people, we’re not defined by our abilities or disabilities. It’s our choices, our aspirations, and our attitudes that define us. So, go out there and discover your passions—as I did.

Editor's Note: Are you looking for a way to connect with people who have cerebral palsy and their families? Join the Cerebral Palsy Resource Group on Facebook! This community forum is the perfect place to ask questions, share your experiences and receive support from the cerebral palsy community.

My Gillette Story by Rob Collins, Dad to Cole

Posted On: 02/03/2015

Our family’s journey with epilepsy started in 2007 with an isolated seizure.  Our son Cole, who was just 2 years old at the time, doubled over in early September with a full body seizure.  We had him checked out and thought we were in the clear.  By the time Thanksgiving rolled around, though, Cole was having over 100 seizures per day, of multiple kinds.  We were desperate to get help.  We asked My Gillette Story by Rob Collins, Dad to Colemy brother, Gary, who is a surgeon at Regions Hospital here in St. Paul, for a suggestion.  He told us to go to Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare.  We were referred to Dr. Beverly Wical, a pediatric neurologist at Gillette. 

We tried different medications, none of which seemed to work.  Gillette suggested we get a second opinion, which we did.  That doctor from a different facility told us “pad your kitchen floor and get him a helmet.  I’ve seen this many times.  This is as good as it’ll ever get.”  We were devastated.  That was the Friday before Christmas break of 2007.  Dr. Wical was leaving for two weeks and we were scared.  She cleared her schedule that Friday afternoon and met with us for over two hours.  I remember during that meeting she held up her hand and told us that of the patients she has seen with similar severity of seizures, she could count on one hand the number of patients that are functioning at average or above-average levels. 

I know this doesn’t sound like the best of odds with the information we were getting, but it gave us hope that Cole could be one of the five.  She proceeded to tell us that we’d keep trying new combinations of treatments/meds and hopefully we’d find the magic combination that would work for Cole.  The doctors and staff at Gillette worked continuously to find that magic combination. 

While Gillette wasn’t able to give us the answers as to what our future would hold, we left that meeting not feeling hopeless.

We got through Christmas, but Cole was still having seizures.  We were worried about our son, our family, our finances – wondering if we’d be able to pay for Cole’s medical care.  Could we keep our business solvent with one of us having to be with Cole 24/7 and having two other young daughters to care for?  

By the end of January, 2008, Cole was still seizing and meds weren’t helping.  We talked with Gillette about trying the ketogenic diet, a highly specialized diet that can help treat certain types of epilepsy.  They wanted a 120 day commitment.  At that time, 120 days seemed like an eternity. 

My wife Tammy’s father, Merle, had come to all our appointments with us and helped with Cole so both Tammy and I could concentrate on the doctor.  When we got home and said were going to try this high-fat, low carb, low protein, low calorie diet to control seizures, our families said they didn’t see any way that bacon and butter would stop Cole’s My Gillette Story by Rob Collins, Dad to Coleseizures.  But Merle simply said, “They don’t have any other choice.”  And that was it.  We got started on the diet. 

We noticed immediately some clarity.  It took 90 days, but on day 90, Cole went seizure free for a whole day and, essentially, hasn’t looked back. 

Cole has been seizure free for just over six years.  As we were preparing this blog post, we realized that Karri Larson, our Gillette dietician, has approved everything that Cole has eaten over the last six or so years. 

We’ve taken the diet on road trips to Florida, Branson, Texas, Sedona, The Grand Canyon, Yellowstone and Glacier Parks as well as many times to Lutsen on Minnesota’s North Shore.  Cole is now 9 years old and thriving. He is in a partial Spanish Immersion program in Forest Lake Public Schools.  He is in Boy Scouts, likes to camp, hike, play Legos and Skylanders.  He’s active in his church and loves to swim.

Thank you Karri.  Thank you to Shani Norberg, M.D.,Nancy Kammer, M.D., Beverly Wical, M.D. and so many of the Gillette nurses and support staff that have been so helpful and have given us our life back.


My Gillette Story by Heather Haigh, Mom to Jackson

Posted On: 12/31/2014

My son, Jackson, was born full term and healthy, weighing 8 pounds, on Halloween 2012. Except for acid reflux that developed shortly after birth, he had no problems—until April 5, 2013. That typical Friday morning changed our lives.

Jackson was unable to keep down any nutrition that day.

He still can’t.

Within a few days, he was admitted to a hospital for dehydration, where he lived on sugar water and IVs for two weeks. He couldn’t keep down even an eyedropper full of formula, breast milk, or anything else. He dropped from the 50th percentile for height and weight to below zero.

He was fighting for his life, and no one knew why.

Even today, his primary condition is a mystery, though Jackson has been diagnosed with 38 secondary conditions. His body rejects saliva, and he can’t live without a feeding tube. We were referred to Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare for palliative care in May 2014. We see Scott Schwantes, M.D., and he is absolutely amazing. He has developed a plan to manage Jackson’s pain and improve his quality of life. We can't fix Jackson's conditions, but we can manage them.

Jackson used to have episodes of autonomic neuropathy (also called dysautonomia)—complete with heart-wrenching, full-body nerve pain—up to six times a day. Dysautonomia is a very complex dysfunction of the autonomic nervous system. Jackson’s temperature would swing from 93 to 103 degrees every few minutes. We are now down to six episodes a month on average, and his temperature usually ranges from 94 to 97 degrees.  Gillette understands the condition and is helping us manage it the best that we can.  

We’ve developed a good handle on things, especially compared to what it was like before we began coming to Gillette. I’m forever grateful for the quality of care and depth of discussions that take place during appointments. For example, last summer we saw Marshall Taniguchi, M.D., a pediatric rehabilitation medicine specialist. He was going to assess when Jackson could begin wearing a feeding tube backpack, but he did so much more. He assessed Jackson’s symptoms at the time and referred us to several specialists to help us with many issues. Each specialist looks at the big picture, not solely their own specialty.

That appointment day, Jackson received a helmet to protect his head from his frequent falls. We have since seen urology, neurology, and sleep medicine specialists. Although Jackson is living with machines, and his daily challenges can be severe, he is thriving. He smiles and plays and is a little boy. He laughs, giggles, is learning sign language, and claps every time he does something right.

I make a point of giving Jackson a childhood in between medical life. I refuse to have him remember only the medical aspect of his life, so we try to do a lot of fun things. He learns at his own pace, works hard at therapy, can tell a story with his eyes, and enjoys life to its fullest. One thing we’re trying to live by is the quote above Jackson’s crib: “Let him sleep now, for tomorrow he will move mountains.”

Jackson inspires everyone he meets, including me. Despite countless tests, procedures, lab draws, doctor appointments and therapies, Jackson is the happiest little boy ever.  Our journey isn’t over, but we are so blessed. I thank God every day for the angels he sent to us, including everyone at Gillette. My son wouldn’t be where he is without them. I can't thank you all enough.  We have a long way to go, but I feel safe under your hands.  


My Gillette Story by Stephanie Petersen, Mom to Sadie

Posted On: 12/23/2014

My Gillette Story by Stephanie Loeffler, Mom to Sadie Sadie blessed us in this world on November 12, 2012 – three weeks before her due date. What we thought was going to be another normal, easy delivery, ended up being an emergency cesarean section. At birth, Sadie was small for her age, suffered from an enlarged liver, heart, and spleen, and had calcifications throughout her brain. A few days after her birth we found out that the cause of all of this was cytomegalovirus (CMV), a virus that I had contracted while I had been pregnant. We were devastated by the news. Hearing that our little girl could be deaf, never walk or talk, and would probably have seizures was horrific news to swallow.

After 3 weeks in the NICU we got to take our sweet little girl home. When Sadie was 20 months old, we were introduced to Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare during one of her routine physical therapy appointments. Her therapist noticed that when Sadie used her gait trainer to walk, her left foot turned and started to drag more and more. Together we thought braces would be a good option. Her recommendation was to go to Gillette and that’s where we met the amazing Nanette Aldahondo, M.D. She would be the one to diagnose Sadie with diplegic spastic cerebral palsy.

From that very first visit we learned so much about Sadie's diagnosis and where we were going to go from there. Sadie was fitted for her braces that My Gillette Story by Stephanie Loeffler, Mom to Sadie same day and within a month she had them. We also planned to have Sadie see Dr. Aldahondo a few months later for botulinum toxin injections. Between Sadie’s AFO (ankle-foot orthoses) fitting and her botulinum toxin  appointment, she began walking on her own! At her botulinum toxin appointment, Dr. Aldahondo was so pleased with Sadie's progress she suggested not doing the injections that time and we agreed! She thought we were going to be upset that she wasn't going to do them, but in fact we were very pleased. We were pleased that Dr. Aldahondo took the time to  explain the reasoning why and the effects it could have on Sadie just learning to walk.

We have another appointment in January to check Sadie's progress and we will determine if botulinum toxin injections are needed at that time. Sadie is a very active child and she tries to do everything her older siblings do. She is starting to run and even though she stumbles and falls quite a bit, she gets right back up and runs more. She is a determined little girl—a fighter!  We have been so grateful for the wonderful care that our little girl has received from Gillette.

My Gillette Story by Lana Beaton

Posted On: 12/10/2014

Our son Alex (pictured right with brother, James and sister, Stella) was diagnosed with left-hemiplegic cerebral palsy at 14 months old. We were unsure of what that would mean for Alex and for our family, but we felt confident in our hometown physician. Alex was on a great path, and he improved by leaps and bounds in the year after his diagnosis. Unfortunately, less than a year later, her career took her away from the area, and from us. We knew our care plan with Alex would be a long road, and we didn’t feel comfortable leaving that up to chance. We were beside ourselves with worry.

James, Alex and StellaWe reached out to the exiting physician, pleaded with her to give us some guidance even though Alex was no longer her patient. She gave us the best advice we could have ever gotten. She said, “You’ll have to make the 5-hour trip to see someone there, but if he were mine, I’d take him to Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare in St. Paul.”

With that, we made the first call and scheduled a consult with a doctor at Gillette. From the minute we walked into the gorgeous facility and met the smiling staff and helpful nurses, we knew that we had found the place for us. Our doctors at Gillette, Marcia Ward, M.D., and Stephen Sundberg, M.D., take such amazing care when working with Alex and our whole family. They work around activities (such as travel and new babies and football games) to make sure that he gets the care that he needs, while helping us maintain a normal family life.  Alex has had inpatient and outpatient surgeries at Gillette, he’s participated in gait lab analysis (so cool!), and he’s utilized the Assistive Technology Department (ATD) Mobile Outreach services (Joel is amazing!) for his ATD needs. It’s amazing to us how all of this care comes together so seamlessly.

Now, at 12 years old, Alex is a strong, big kid. He is resilient, courageous, fun...and just downright awesome. His differences may make things more difficult, but he never lets them slow him down. He is active in sports (aspiring to take our racquetball community by storm this year) and is "that kid” at school who everyone loves—teachers and kids alike. He's an A student in seventh grade and a wizard with anything engineering. (He has a small fortune invested in the coolest LEGO collection you've ever seen!)  

We wouldn’t think of going anywhere else. There are new providers in our area. New clinics and rehab facilities pop up all the time. But regardless of the convenience factor a closer clinic may offer, we know Gillette is the best place for our son. The care and exceptional services we receive make the trip a no-brainer! Thank you Gillette for taking such great care of us!

Editor's note: Become a fan of the Cerebral Palsy Resource Group on Facebook to connect with others and recieve support from the cerebral palsy community.

My Gillette Story by Mary Barsness

Posted On: 10/30/2014

On July 7, 2014, our 14-year-old son, Willi, fell off his longboard in the neighborhood. (A longboard is a type of skateboard that’s longer and faster than most boards.) What followed was the kind of night that parents fear. Willi had not been wearing a helmet. Despite no external injuries, he had cracked his skull, and his brain was bleeding in three places. Debbie Song, M.D., a pediatric neurosurgeon at Gillette, performed an emergency craniotomy that night, and Willi was admitted into Gillette’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU).

Those first few days were full of uncertainty and fear. Watching the doctors and nurses care for him in such an acute situation was amazing to us. They were consistently calm, respectful and efficient. And it wasn’t just Willi they were taking care of either. They made sure Willi’s father and I were eating and drinking, and they encouraged us to sleep. They were helping us manage our mental and physical health so that we could be as strong as possible for Willi. The nurses and doctors spent so much time answering our questions and comforting us. Never did we feel like anyone was rushing us, or bothered by our constant need for reassurance and comfort.

As we were working to wrap our minds around what had happened many staff members from Gillette’s well-oiled team came by to let us know what they had set up for us. Child Life helped us organize a time for Willi’s friends to come up to the hospital so they could be together and make cards for him. They also helped us navigate this new terrain with Willi’s little sisters. They gave us bears and coloring books to give the girls when they came to see him, as well as fantastic advice about how to get them ready for their first visit.

We were given a room at Ronald McDonald house that we used to rotate family through for naps and showers. We had hot, delicious meals provided by amazing volunteers. We met a social worker who helped us navigate all of the new information. She was always there for us when the new questions popped up, and she guided us through our stay in the PICU and our transition over to the rehab unit. We never asked for these services. In truth, we didn’t know they existed. Gillette anticipated our needs at every turn.

After a while, our friends and families had to go back to their children, their towns and their jobs. It was scary to think of being there “alone,” but we never were. I’m not sure when it happened, but it seemed all along that everyone at Gillette knew us and was part of the team taking care of our whole family. From the staff who always came in so respectfully to clean Willi’s room, to the desk managers at Ronald McDonald, everyone always asked how we were doing. Sometimes they got more than they bargained for, and even then, they would spend time reassuring us. For weeks, people hugged us and shared our joys and fears.

How do you say thank you to the doctors who saved your child’s life? How could we ever explain how much it meant that people said hello, hugged us without reservation when we needed it, and laughed with us in those impossibly amazing moments? Their openness to us made us feel safe in a time when nothing felt OK.

Daily we see people raising money for various charities that help people in crisis. I have thrown my change in the bucket in the drive-thru window for years to give to Gillette fundraisers, but not once did I ever consider I may someday be using those services. As you walk around Gillette, you see all the plaques of donors and fundraisers who raised money to offer these services and amazing facilities. By giving to Gillette, so many people have helped us through an event we never planned for. We are so grateful for all of the supports that Gillette has in place for the life’s unpredictable moments.

Willi is home and attending school full time. We call his recovery a miracle. We know it was a miracle carried out by many hands.

Pictured: Willi with Debbie Song, M.D. in Gillette's rehab unit and Willi with mom and dad.


Meet Us Monday- Ike Woodruff, Casting Technician

Posted On: 10/10/2014

1. What is your position and role at Gillette? I am a ortho technician in the casting room at Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare.

2. Do you have a favorite Gillette story or memory? I casted a young lady for over a year and had the privilege of seeing her wear shoes for the first time in her life and she was 18-years-old at the time.

3. What are some of your hobbies outside of work? I like to draw and paint. I am also a huge Packer fan.

4. Do you have any children or pets? I have three daughters, two rabbits and a fish.

5. If you could travel anywhere, where would you go? I’d go to Santorini Greece or Italy.

6. What is one fun fact about you? I am a total Sci-Fi nerd!

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