Your infant or toddler will wear elbow splints (sometimes called “no-nos”) after surgery. These fabric splints wrap around your child’s forearms, elbows and upper arms. The splints restrict movement at the elbow joints and help keep fingers, toys and objects out of your child’s mouth. The splints also prevent your child from pulling on incisions, intravenous lines and tubing during hospitalization.

Children typically wear the elbow splints during their hospital stay and at home for approximately one to two weeks after surgery to prevent disruption of the surgical repair. You can remove the elbow splints whenever an adult supervises your child — for example: during feeding or bathing, or when your child is being held by family members or other caregivers. If your child is later going to play without direct supervision, replace the splints.

Check the skin on your child’s arms frequently — approximately every four hours while your child is awake — to make sure the skin underneath the splints is healthy, without redness or sores. Also give your child occasional breaks from the elbow splints while you supervise. That’s important, as it allows for some normal movement of your child’s elbow joints. 

This information is for educational purposes only. It is not intended to replace the advice of your health care providers. If you have any questions, talk with your doctor or others on your health care team.